“Indy Star”: Who Was the Prophet Muhammad Really?

He was a husband, a businessman, a grandfather, a warrior, a judge, a politician, and a religious leader. For many of the 1.8 billion Muslims around the world, Muhammad ibn Abdullah (died, 632 CE) is also the human being most worthy of respect, love and imitation. God chose him among all human beings to receive the Qur’an, God’s Word. They mention him in their prayers, religious … Continue reading “Indy Star”: Who Was the Prophet Muhammad Really?

“Indy Star”: IUPUI professor offers grants to creative types to battle Islamophobia

“To combat Islamophobia, an IUPUI professor is turning to crowd-sourcing the arts and humanities.” Arts reporter Domenica Bongiovanni interviewed me about the competition, asking why I thought the arts and humanities could help to prevent anti-Muslim violence. A link to the story is here.   Continue reading “Indy Star”: IUPUI professor offers grants to creative types to battle Islamophobia

Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia

I am happy to announce ten awards of $1,000 each to prevent Islamophobia, or anti-Muslim prejudice, discrimination, and violence, in Greater Indianapolis. Highly original projects are sought from local writers, community activists, artists, religious congregations, public school teachers, dancers, community volunteers, philosophers, amateur historians, linguists, musicians, healers, social workers, poets, non-profit groups, and others. Projects can include performance, social media, debate, dialogue, the production of … Continue reading Community Competition to Prevent Islamophobia

Indianapolis’ Ahmadi Muslims in the 1920s and 1930s

Originally posted on Invisible Indianapolis:
This is the second of two posts on 20th-century Muslim heritage in Indianapolis that come to us from Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and Professor of Religious Studies at the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Edward E. Curtis IV. Click on Indianapolis’ Homegrown Islam: The Moorish Science Temple of America for the first post. Mirzā Ghulām Ahmad (1835-1908), the… Continue reading Indianapolis’ Ahmadi Muslims in the 1920s and 1930s

Indiana’s First Mosque? Syrian Shi’a Muslims in Michigan City

Michigan City, Indiana, was likely the site of Indiana’s first purpose-built mosque. Muslim immigrants from the Ottoman Empire, especially from what today are the countries of Syria and Lebanon, immigrated to the state in the 1890s, if not before. But it was only in the twentieth century that Islam in Indiana began to develop as an institutionalized American religion that, like other American religions, created … Continue reading Indiana’s First Mosque? Syrian Shi’a Muslims in Michigan City

Indianapolis’ Homegrown Islam: The Moorish Science Temple of America

Originally posted on Invisible Indianapolis:
This week’s post comes to us from Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and Professor of Religious Studies at the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Edward E. Curtis IV In May, 1939 the Moorish Science Temple advertised a Decoration Day (Memorial Day) dance in the Indianapolis Knights of Pythias Hall (click for an expanded view). In the 1930s… Continue reading Indianapolis’ Homegrown Islam: The Moorish Science Temple of America