The Transnational and Diasporic Future of African American Religions in the United States

In this article, published in the June 2019 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Sylvester Johnson and I call forth a vision for the future study of African American religions in the United States by examining how transnational contact and diasporic consciousness have affected the past practice and are likely to affect the future practice of Christianity, Islam, and African-derived, Orisha-based religions in Black America. It offers a synthesis of scholarly literature and charts possible directions for analyzing Africana religions beyond the ideological and geographical boundaries of the nation-state. The article focuses on two primary forms of imagined and physical movement: the immigration of self-identifying Black people from Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, Mexico, and other places to the United States; and the travel, tourism, pilgrimage, and other movement—whether physical or not—of American-born Black people to places outside the Unites States.

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Citation: Edward E Curtis, Sylvester A Johnson, “The Transnational and Diasporic Future of African American Religions in the United States,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Volume 87, Issue 2, June 2019, Pages 333–365, https://doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfz018